• BLOG
  • Biking In Zermatt

    Tiina Kivelä

    Biking (MTB) in Zermatt. Such wow.

    Although I still haven’t done any biking in Zermatt, I do think it’s a good idea of tell you about it. Because even though I didn’t have my bike with me last weekend in Zermatt, I did see many super happy looking bikers and awesome trails for biking (and many awesome bikes – the fever is high). And I simply came came to the conclusion that Zermatt truly lives to its reputation when it comes to MTB. The scenery and wild landscape – hello Matterhorn – makes a good base, on which more than ok infra, planning and car free village make it eventually a kind of a bikers paradise. Even for my kind of wannabe/beginner (not long though!).

    What’s really interesting in Zermatt is that almost all the roads and trails are open for both bikers and hikers. And on top of that, the village is car free, which makes it a good break for the daily urban bike commuters fighters too.

    In Zermatt, there are flowtrails and other paths only for biking and trails prohibited from bikers, but generally the rule goes that mtb riders are allowed to ride on all roads, unless a prohibition sign forbids it. Though this means – of course – that the highest level of consideration and peaceful playing is required on the paths in and around Zermatt, Täsch and Randa (=nearby villages).  Haters will hate but also, I only met considerate and friendly bikers on the paths and as a kind of multisport hustler myself I think we all fit on the same trails more than fine and destinations and trails can serve various modes of use at the same time.

    So go. It’s also the best season now. But please, really, be nice, make space and keep an eye for others. Both for people and animals.

    Biking in Zermatt – How And Where Exactly

    As I didn’t have the bike I don’t have many detailed tips for biking in Zermatt yet, sorry. But I saw and confirmed with the help of the ones who know better that the Gornergrat side and trails around Schwarzee / Schönbielhütte direction are more than nice. And if taking the Matterhorn direction from Zermatt village center, you can even have lunch or beer in the adorable (more than fine for badass bikers too) village of Zmutt on your way back.

    More information of biking in and around Zermatt in i.e. Supertrail guide in here – and hopefully by me once I get back there with a bike.  Oh and the weather this weekend, when I was free, was kind moody. Therefore, a bit grainy and moody pics. But you should get the point, I hope.

    Ps. (Guidelines for mountain biking in and around Zermatt, pdf)

    Tiina Kivelä

    Tiina Kivelä


    Where: Zermatt

    How: Take the train to Zermatt (bike comes well along with the SBB bike day pass). Book your sleep in any of the hotels, cabins, huts or maybe try the same hostel where I stayed (Zermatt Youth Hostel) in Zermatt.

    Then, get a day or two’s pass for the lifts and trains in the area, and just enjoy. 

    When: Autumn.

     

  • BLOG
  • Zermatt

    Tiina Kivelä

     

    Went to Zermatt for a long weekend. And loved it, despite the moody weather and mainly work. Or maybe loved exactly for that – no crowds on trails and refreshingly different work than normally.

    More pics and stories coming later, now just quick <3 to Zermatt and its trails.

    Tiina Kivelä

     

    Tiina Kivelä

     

    Tiina Kivelä

    Tiina Kivelä

    Where: Zermatt

  • BLOG
  • Pyhä

    Tiina Kivelä

    Monday morning well spent.

    I used to live and work in here briefly, in the Pyhä Ski Resort and Pyhä Luosto National Park in Northern Finland, above the Arctic Circle. Back then (I sound so old – not really sooo back then, just a few years ago) on these trails, and in a matter of fact on all the trails in this and other national parks in Finnish Lapland, mountain biking was prohibited.

    Back then, this was just a sleepy hiking and trail running paradise in summer, and skiing (alpine and Nordic) paradise in winter. This was also the place I and many more learned to really ski and where we, the kids from the neighboring towns, spent almost every winter weekend.

    Later some made it to the Olympics, some bumming to the Alps.

    Nowadays the place’s still all that but also a mountain biking paradise, both in summer and winter. This thanks to last year when, after many years of talking and lobbying, many trails in the national parks and near them were opened and even built from scratch for the two-wheeled ones, with the help of the modified park rules and the growing trend.

    In winter on snow and in summer in the most rocky parts – kind of which you find plenty of here –  the trails are best with a fatbike. A normal one is also more than fine in summer, but remember to keep a well-equipped maintenance kit with you (and good protection on) then.

    The quartzite doesn’t have much mercy.

    This time I was just trail running the appr. 12km path through this tunturiaapa marshland to the Isokuru gorge and past Karhunjuomalampi day hut back to the ski resort, and snapping few pics of these silvery pine woods, my rare favourites of the dead things in nature, and of the hill chain (tunturiketju, as we call these in Finnish) which continues north from Pyhä to Luosto ski resort and village.

    Things haven’t changed much since I left and this is always a good place to come back for a visit, as one of the few places in Lapland with the authentic original Lapland spirit left, with grey log cabin, one small hotel (which would need a renovation though) and many stories and legends to read and hear when in town.

    For starters, ask for the story of Huttu-Ukko, or of the hill on the left in the pics – Noitatuntunturi, Witchhill.

    Tiina Kivelä


    Where: Pyhä Ski Resort / Pyhä-Luosto National Park, Lapland, Finland.

    mtb trailmap